Placement Stability and Permanancy

Using Social Media in Recruitment

 

These resources can help you decide if your agency is ready to use social media as a tool for recruiting and retaining families, and which networks you might consider using.

Social media encompasses a wide range of online networks that connect people. There are many well-es­tablished social networks (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) and other new ones being developed and gaining in popularity (e.g. Pinterest, Tumblr, etc.). Although there are some similarities across social media networks, most have distinct functions and styles. For example:

  • Facebook is commonly used for more informal, social interaction;
  • Twitter uses short blurbs of information and brief conversations;
  • LinkedIn is for professional networking;
  • Flickr is for sharing photos and blogging;
  • YouTube is for sharing videos.

These resources can help you decide if your agency is ready to use social media as a tool for recruiting and retaining families, and which networks you might consider using.

Use our flowchart Which Social Network Should Your Agency Use to Reach Families? to help you determine which social networks your agency should consider using as part of your recruitment and retention efforts.

Facebook for Child Welfare Professionals

Facebook offers many features and has functionality that differentiates it from other social media platforms. Understanding these differences can help child welfare agencies assess whether Facebook is an appropriate tool to use as part of your agency’s work.

Twitter for Child Welfare Professionals

Twitter offers many features and has functionality that differentiates it from other social media networks. Understanding these differences can help child welfare agencies assess whether Twitter is an appropriate tool to use as part of your agency’s work.

  • Your postings on Twitter (i.e., “Tweets”) have a limit of 140 characters, including punctuation and spaces, to communicate each message.
  • It is a great platform for sharing brief bits of information or links to resources.
  • Your content is very easily shared by others, through “retweets”.
  • It is acceptable to share the same information multiple times, although not too often.

Twitter 101 for Child Welfare Professionals: An Introduction to Using Twitter to Reach Foster, Adoptive, and Kinship Families (PDF – 281 KB)
An overview of Twitter and how it could work in the context of a child welfare agency that serves foster and adoptive families

Twitter 201 for Child Welfare Professionals: Strategies and Best Practices for Using Twitter to Reach Foster, Adoptive, and Kinship Families (PDF – 369 KB)
Your guide to using Twitter with tips and best practices to get the most out of a Twitter profile for your agency’s efforts to recruit and retain foster and adoptive families

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